Proposed Schedule

Week 1: Knowledge Production and Modeling explores how humanities scholars pursue research questions with digital tools. We inquire into the gaps, silences, and relations of power in the archives. Who records the past? How do we represent or model knowledge? How do we represent archival sources? What distortions occur in the migration from analog to digital? How can existing archives be decolonized and new archives be designed more inclusively? Participants will design, build, and model a digital collection of sources and archival data of their own in week one. Technical workshops in week one will focus especially on the deployment of standard tools and base technologies for knowledge production. We will also discuss ways in which to use these technologies in the classroom and how to train students to work on digital projects.

Monday
9:00 a.m.

Introductions led by Castro, Jones, Price, and Thomas

9:30 a.m. Roopika Risam, "Transforming Digital Humanities"
10:30 a.m. Participant Q & A with Risam
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. What is Digital Scholarship? with Risam, Jones, and Thomas
2:30 p.m. Break
3:00 p.m. Participant Flash Talks

Assignments/Readings

Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Amanda Phillips, "Designing for Difference"
10:30 a.m. Participant Q & A with Phillips and Risam
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. How to Design Metadata and Information Architecture with Weakly, Dalziel, and Barney
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m Break
3:45 p.m. Digital Methods Plenary with Risam and Phillips moderated by Castro and Jones

Assignments/Readings

  • Amanda Phillips, "Feminism and Procedural Content Generation: Toward an Interdisciplinary Politics of Computational Creativity," with Gillian Smith, Michael Cook, and Tanya Short, in Digital Creativity 27, no. 1 (2016).
  • Andrew Hurley, "Chasing the Frontiers of Digital Technology: Public History Meets the Digital Divide," The Public Historian 38, no. 1 (February 2016): 69-88.
  • Adam Rothman, "Facing Slavery's Legacy at Georgetown," November 2016
  • "The Georgetown Slavery Archive"
Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Kent Blansett, "Native American Digital History"
10:30 a.m. Q & A with Blansett
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. How to Digitize with Barney, Nash, and Weakly
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m Break
3:45 p.m. How to Manage Projects with Weakly, Dalziel, and Nash

Assignments/Readings

  • Deidre Brown and George Nicholas, "Protecting Indigenous Cultural Property in the Age of Digital Democracy: Institutional and Communal Responses to Canadian First Nations and Maori Heritage Concerns," Journal of Material Culture, 17, no. 3 (2012), 307–324.
  • Siobhan Senier, "Digitizing Indigenous History: Trends and Challenges," Journal of Victorian Culture, 19, no. 3 (2014), 396–402.
  • Kelley Kreitz, "Toward a Latinx digital humanities pedagogy: remixing, reassembling, and reimagining the archive," Educational Media International, 54:4 (2017), 304-316.
Thursday
9:00 a.m. Kent Blansett and Rebecca Wingo, "State of the FieldNative American History"
10:30 a.m. Participant Q & A with Blansett and Wingo
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. How to Manage Data with Tunink, Dussault, and Weakly
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m Break
3:45 p.m. Digital Pedagogy Plenary with Blansett and Wingo moderated by Jones and Price

Assignments/Readings

  • Janet Murray, Inventing the Medium, selections
Friday
9:00 a.m. Narrative Workshop: "Discovering the Architecture of Your Core Narrative," with Castro
10:30 a.m. Participant Q & A
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. How to Design Web Pages with HTML/CSS with Dalziel, Nash, and Tunink
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m Break
3:45 p.m. Digital Media Design Plenary: "Digital Media Storytelling Technique and Practice" with Thomas and Kwakiutl Dreher

Assignments/Readings

Week 2: Knowledge Representation in the Digital Medium explores how we turn data into digital stories and narratives in ways that exploit the affordances of the digital medium, from web delivery, to dynamic maps, images, and databases. What are the properties of digital narratives? How is knowledge represented, circulated, and decoded in the digital medium? What choices do scholars have in the production of digital scholarship? The technical workshops in week two focus on developing facility with widely used digital humanities Content Management Systems. Drawing on their archives, participants will design different modes to tell the story of a community, a family, an ordeal, or a triumph. Participants will discuss ways in which to integrate this work in their classrooms and in their home institutions. How do we teach our students to create stories in the digital medium? Participants will work on creating and sharing assignments for undergraduate learning.

Monday
9:00 a.m.

Jessica Marie Johnson, TBA

10:30 a.m. Participant Research Design and Q & A with Johnson and Roberts
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. Visualizations for Exploration and Presentation with Dussault and Dalziel
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m. Break
3:45 p.m. Digital Methods Plenary with Johnson and Roberts moderated by Jones

Assignments/Readings

Tuesday
9:00 a.m.

Shearon Roberts, "Repair Work in Humanities Digital Media"

10:30 a.m. Participant Research Design and Q & A with Roberts
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. Web Design with Dalziel, Nash, and Barney
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m. Break
3:45 p.m. Digital Pedagogy Plenary with Roberts and Johnson moderated by Jones

Assignments/Readings

Wednesday
9:00 a.m.

Sylvia Fernández, "Border Studies and Digital Humanities"

10:30 a.m. Participant Research Design and Q & A with Fernández, Moreno, and Anderson
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. Website Hosting Basics with Dalziel and Tunink
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m. Break
3:45 p.m. Grant-making Workshop with Thomas and Jones

Assignments/Readings

Thursday
9:00 a.m.

Marisel Moreno-Anderson and Thomas F. Anderson, "Listening to Puerto Rico: and the Question of Project Design"

10:30 a.m. Participant Research Design and Q & A with Fernández, Moreno, and Anderson
Noon Break
1:00 p.m. Designing Collections in Omeka with Weakley and Nash
2:00 p.m. Individual Project Development
3:30 p.m. Break
3:45 p.m. How to Make the Most of Mutual Mentoring with Castro, Jones, Price, and Thomas

Assignments/Readings

  • Project Presentation Research and Preparation

Friday
9:00 a.m.

Participants Project Presentations

Noon Awards Luncheon
3:00 p.m. Future Planning